Governor Abbott tweets demand to remove Russian products from Texas shelves

“I have asked members of the Texas Restaurant Association, the Texas Package Stores Association and all retailers in Texas to voluntarily remove all Russian products from their shelves,” Abbott said. “Texas stands with Ukraine.”

The tweet was criticized by both Republicans and Democrats who called it “unnecessary posturing”.

Stores in other states also removed Russian products, including this Kansas liquor store which pulled Russian vodkas from its shelves, Fox 4 KC reported.

A ski resort in Vermont poured vodka down the drain, the Miami Herald reported.

In Canada, a professor at the University of New Brunswick who has worked on democratic reforms in Russia, Ukraine and Kasakhstan told CBC News that wasting or refusing to sell Russian products is not a punishment.

“It’s certainly symbolically important for those of Ukrainian descent,” Henryk Sterniczuk told CBC. “But … from an economic point of view, it’s not very significant.”

Regardless of its effectiveness, pouring Russian vodka has been a popular way to protest the actions of President Vladimir Putin and other Russian leaders in the past. In 2013, protesters and bar owners used the gesture to take a stand against a Russian anti-gay propaganda law.

FILE: Protesters pour Russian vodka as part of a protest against Russian anti-gay legislation and against Russian President Vladimir Putin’s gay rights stand, outside the Russian consulate in New York, July 31, 2013 Protesters have called for a boycott of Russian products and for the Russian government to repeal the law on anti-gay propaganda ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. AFP PHOTO/Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images

In 1983, bar and restaurant owners refused to serve Russian vodka after a Korean airliner was shot down by a Soviet missile.

FILE: Protesters pour Russian vodka into Boston Harbor aboard the Boston Tea Party ship, Beaver, at its dock on Congress Street in Boston, September 14, 1983. Several members of the group own bars and restaurants refusing to serve Soviet products in protest at the downing of a Korean airliner by a Soviet missile.  (Photo by Ted Dully/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

FILE: Protesters pour Russian vodka into Boston Harbor aboard the Boston Tea Party ship, Beaver, at its dock on Congress Street in Boston, September 14, 1983. Several members of the group own bars and restaurants refusing to serve Soviet products in protest at the downing of a Korean airliner by a Soviet missile. (Photo by Ted Dully/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

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